Land of the Giants, Mashatu, Botswana

Across the Limpopo to Mashatu in Botswana

4 Oct. We are looking forward to driving in Landy again and it is strange to leave the camp and go back into civilisation after living in the bush for so long. We decide to leave earlier in Landy than the rest of the guys in the Eco Training Minibus as we want to get some shopping from Tzaneen on the way to the border crossing. As we head north the terrain begins to change as we arrive in the beautiful area around Mapangubwe.

After a quick stop in Alldays for a milkshake with our instructor Graham whilst we wait for the minibus, we are back on the the road and soon at Pontdrift Border Crossing. Landy makes short work of the deep sand dry river bed crossing and we soon complete formalities at Customs at surely one of the quietest and quickest border controls in South Africa (apart perhaps from the one at Richtersveld).

First impressions of Mashatu? Unbelievably beautiful. Huge rocky outcrops, large trees and lots of open space look perfect for game drives and bush walks. I think we are going to like it here.

Eco Training Mashatu Camp

Even on the way to the camp we see plenty of wildlife including elephants at a waterhole where a baby was having great fun harassing a warthog. The terrain becomes more interesting as we approach Eco Training’s camp as it is right on the banks of Motloutse River and very close to a feature known as Solomans Wall, a 30-metre high and 10-metre wide basalt dyke. This unusual feature once formed a steep-sided natural dam wall across the river and held back a vast lake, with water spilling over it, until it finally gave way and the river began to flow. Of course now the river flows only occasionally and for now it is dry.

When we arrive at camp it is to find that the lecture room overlooks the dry river and  it couldn’t be a more idyllic place to live and learn. We  are pleased to find that we can park Landy right next to the camp so it seems logical for us to set up our roof tent and sleep in comfort and leave the small ground tents with accompanying bugs to the young ones. We try not to feel smug!

After everyone has settled in and we all have a look around our home for the next month we set off on a game drive. Sad to say that the vehicles here are Toyotas, not Land Rovers but you can’t have everything. The vegetation here is very different to that which we have been used to so far. Huge appleleaf trees and Mashatu Trees line the river and majestic Baobabs cling to the side of the hills. There are Mopane forests which are loved by the large herds of elephants that can be found here and there are so many different types of flowers and plants that we are going to have our work cut out remembering them for our game drives.

As dusk falls we arrive at Mmamagwa Hill which is an extremely important historical place, formally part of the Kingdom of Mapungubwe (1075–1220), the first stage of development that would lead in the 13th century to the Kingdom of Great Zimbabwe.

camping Africa Land Rover
Mmamagwa Hill for sundowners.

We climb up the hill as the sun begins to set and the colour of the sky is beautiful, a lone Baobab tree silhouetted against the orange is the perfect place to sit and contemplate our surroundings and how much we are going to enjoy living here. Cecil Rhodes even carved his name into this tree, its clearly a place that has intrigued visitors for a long time. An extra treat on the way back to camp though; Springhares. I have never seen them before and I just wish I had the ability to take good photos of animals in the spot lights at night.

Mashatu Africa land rover camping
The Baobab tree on Mmamagwa Hill.

The night proves to be exciting too. We have elephants wandering around the camp during the night. So close that we can hear them breathing outside our tent as well as their low rumbles and soft footsteps through the undergrowth.

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